News and Events

Local camp leaders get superhero training

June 23, 2017
 

As the school year winds down, kids are getting ready for new experiences at summer camps all across Medicine Hat. The staff leading their camps are getting ready, too.

Many of the city’s summer camp leaders will have an opportunity on Monday, Jun 26 to attend Superhero Camp Leader Training. This program is a joint initiative from several community groups aiming to equip camp leaders with the tools and skills they need to deliver positive and motivating experiences for local youth.

According to Amy Risk-Richardson of the local Be Fit For Life Centre at Medicine Hat College, the main focus of the training will aim to support physical literacy in camp goers. “Physical literacy is about teaching the fundamental movement skills needed for sport and play, and doing it in a way that develops confidence. Encouraging an individual’s confidence with early successes will help keep them motivated to stay active for life.”

PLAY Medicine Hat (Physical Literacy and You) is a local collaborative interested in supporting the development of physical literacy and is connected to PLAY Alberta. PLAY Groups are located across the province and interested Albertans can engage with their local groups at plconnect.ca.

PLAY Medicine Hat is putting on the Superhero Camp Leader Training and its members include the Medicine Hat College Be Fit For Life Centre, the City of Medicine Hat, Medicine Hat Family YMCA and Medicine Hat Adaptive Sport & Recreation. These partner organizations identified a gap in camp leader training and together have developed a program that provides young leaders the skills and perspective to deliver programing to kids that will encourage a sense of taking care of themselves, and taking care of their community.

PLAY Medicine Hat

Each organization has contributed to the planning of the event, and will provide expertise in facilitating the training which will be delivered in a fun, game-oriented approach. Much of the training will focus on active skills, but the approach can be applied to all instructional scenarios. 

Tara Chisholm of Medicine Hat Adaptive Sports & Recreation is excited about how this training could improve local delivery of physical education, and help camp leaders understand an inclusive and flexible way of leading and teaching. “Even leaders for sport specific camps who are proficient in the skills of their individual sport can benefit from this training. They might know lots of drills for kicking or throwing, but this training is going to take a sport or skill, break it down, and teach those elements through active play, rather than just a traditional sports drill.”

Each camp leader will walk away with a toolkit of games they can implement in their camps and a checklist to help them teach new skills with an appropriate delivery method.

“We want the leaders to obtain a better understanding of how to teach a particular skill, and how to teach in a positive way overall,” says Risk-Richardson. “Whether you are teaching physical skills or math skills, positive teaching will get you further along.”